This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Millions of Egyptians are voting in the country's first democratic elections since the ouster of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak a year and a half ago, the Associated Press reports.

The two-day election pits leaders of the Mubarak era against Islamists, who have gained popularity since the 2011 revolution. The Muslim Brotherhood is the most popular of those groups, and already holds substantial power in the parliament. There are 50 million eligible voters.

While Mubarak was president, the autocratic leader ran unopposed in elections, giving voters the simple option of a yes-or-no ballot. The military, which took over after last year's revolution, has agreed to give up power by July 1.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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