This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

The Basics

17.8 million: The number of Asians living in the U.S. Asians make up 5.6% of the U.S. population.

33.5: The median age for Asians. The cohort is younger than the general U.S. public, which boasts a median age of 37.3.

28.9%: The percentage of Asians 25 years and over that have a bachelor's degree. In comparison, 17.9 percent of the U.S. general population has a bachelor's degree. The next largest plurality, 20.6 percent, have some college education or an associate's degree, followed closely by 20.1 percent of whom have a graduate or professional degree. 

85.6%: The percentage of Asians who possess at least a high school diploma or higher.

10.5 million: The number of Asians in the U.S. who were not born in the U.S. That's about 59 percent of all Asians in the U.S.

24.1%: The percentage of Asians who are employed in educational services, health care or social assistance. It is the largest plurality by industry, followed by professional, scientific or management industries (13.2 percent) and manufacturing (11.9 percent).

$66,633: The median household income for Asians. That's slightly higher than the general U.S. population at $50,502.

12.9%: The percentage of Asians living in poverty status. That's slightly lower than the U.S. average at 15.9 percent.

Other Facts of Note

46%: The percentage of growth of Asians between 2000 and 2010, the fastest of any other racial demographic and more than four times faster than the overall U.S. population.

75%: The approximate percentage of the Asian population concentrated in just 10 states, with California, New York, and Texas at the top of the list.

30%: The smallest percentage of growth for the Asian population among 49 states between 2000 and 2010. The Asian population grew by at least 30 percent in all states except Hawaii, which saw an 11 percent increase. The highest growth was in Nevada and Arizona, with increases of 116 percent and 95 percent, respectively.

Data based on the 2011 American Community Survey and the 2010 Census brief. Data includes those who identified as Asian alone or in combination with some other racial/ethnic group.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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