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Mitt Romney has won the Wisconsin Republican primary, Fox News projects, meaning he swept all three contests Tuesday night and squashed what was declared to be Rick Santorum's last last chance to make a comeback. With 12 percent of precincts reporting, Romney had 42 percent of the vote to Santorum's 39 percent.

According to exit polls, there was no big bump in evangelical voters, which would have helped Santorum, The New York Times reports. Other significant findings of the exit polls:

  • Santorum won dads, Romney won moms. Santorum won unmarried people, Romney won married people. Romney won unmarried women with kids by 11 points.
  • Santorum won Democrats by 18 points.
  • Romney won conservative and very conservative voters.
  • Romney won every subgroup of opinions of the Tea Party -- support, oppose, neutral -- except people who "strongly oppose" the group. Santorum won those folks, oddly. Santorum won them 34 percent to Romney's 19 percent. That must be Santorum's  Democratic vote.
  •  Ron Paul won people under 30.

In his concession speech, Rick Santorum said it was "halftime" in the primary, because half of delegates have been awarded. That is true -- but they've been awarded mostly to Romney! He told supporters, "Who's ready to charge out of the locker room in Pennsylvania for a strong second half?" Santorum also threw out references to marching bands, Hessians, and the Etch A Sketch. He said he has "every intention" of staying in till May. That's less than rock solid.

A Romney aide tweeted this photo of the candidate watching the results come in:

Note how somberly he watches the news that yet again, evangelicals didn't vote for him. Still, unlike in most primaries past, conservatives did.

Romney was introduced by Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, who is basically the Edward Cullen for conservative nerds. The Washington Post's Chris Cillizza suggests Ryan has been trying out for running mate. In his victory speech, Romney focused on the general election, just like everyone else.

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