This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

The race for the new 33rd District in Texas, which was created to give minorities a greater voice in Congress, could come down to a battle between two minority groups: African-Americans and Hispanics, The Dallas Morning News reports.

Though the district is fully 67 percent Hispanic, just 39 percent of the Hispanic population is eligible to vote, and because the district's African-American communities have a much higher turnout rate — about 45 percent to Hispanics' 32 percent in the last three elections, according to the state Democratic Party — it could be a much closer race than mere population data would suggest.

Eleven Democrats are competing in the May 29 primary. Hispanic contenders, including former state Rep. Domingo Garcia, are forming grassroots operations in hopes of attracting first-time Hispanic voters to the polls, according to The Morning News.

Meanwhile, the three black contenders for the seat are focusing largely on Tarrant County, which has a large African-American population.

With so many Democrats interested in the new seat and no incumbent in sight, the primary is almost certain to lead to a runoff election on July 31.

The winner of that election will be heavily favored in November.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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