Click to enlarge this infographic from One Block Off the Grid, a San-Francisco-based collective for purchasing home solar power:

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With the economy dominating the national political discussion, energy hasn't been a huge issue in the burgeoning 2012 presidential race. But once Republicans have their nominee, we can expect a lot of talk about gas prices, oil exploration, and some echoes of "Drill, Baby, Drill!"

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who presides over the number-one oil-producing state in the U.S., stands a good chance of becoming that nominee -- and he has energy to thank for it. Texas's growing oil-and-gas industry boosted the state economy last year while the rest of the nation suffered; now, Perry is running on a record of job-creation and economic stability. Texas's unique oil economy helped put that "Texas Miracle" on his resume.

The last time a Texas governor occupied the White House, it was a good time for the oil industry. President George W. Bush's administration fought against environmental regulations, emissions standards, and renewable-energy requirements that the oil-and-gas industry opposed. Consequently, green-energy activists were excited to replace him with President Obama, who has since sought to limit oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico while heavily promoting renewable-energy investments as part of his 2009 stimulus package.

Should Perry take over the White House from Obama next year, the main differences we'll see on energy policy are more oil drilling, strong support for fracking, and less federal oversight of the oil-and-gas industry than President Obama has sought to implement, according to One Block Off the Grid.

Image credit: infographic from One Block Off the Grid

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