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Sarah Palin has asked Alaska to help defend her from a lawsuit from an activist seeking $100,000 from Palin because he claims she waged a campaign to "punish, embarrass, discredit and silence" him, the Associated Press reports. Because that alleged smear campaign happened while she was governor, Palin thinks the state should help out. 

Chip Thoma says that after he complained to a state agency -- and passed out fliers -- about all the traffic in Juneau after Palin returned following the 2008 campaign, Palin retaliated. Thoma's evidence is based partly on the leaked manuscript of the book Blind Allegiance To Sarah Palin by former Palin aide Frank Bailey.
 
Why would Alaska help pay? The Associated Press explains:
Assistant Attorney General Dale House said... it's typical for the state to get involved if the person is being sued largely because of the title they held or because of something they did in the course of their official duties. He said there are exceptions, including for criminal cases.
Alaska will foot the bill for House, who will defend Palin, but not for Palin's personal lawyer, who will be co-counsel here. One reason Palin reportedly resigned as governor before the end of her term was her increasing legal bills.

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