American politicians love their lowbrow cuisine. Whether it's diner food in Iowa and New Hampshire or cheesesteaks in Philadelphia, simple food affords them opportunities to show they're just like the rest of us -- with each burger or shake, a candidate ostensibly gets closer to the common man.

For U.S. presidents, that's carried over to hot dogs, a food once frowned upon in the U.S.. From Middle East diplomacy to the brokering of endorsements, the hot dog has held a special place in presidential history.

In honor of July 4, we present some brief excerpts from presidential hot dog history:

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