This article is from the archive of our partner .

This is how wide open the Republican 2012 field is: even though Giuliani has only just begun making noises about running in 2012, after a string of recent public appearances, he is already on top of a new survey of the 2012 Republican candidates, Reuters reports.

In the first poll taken by CNN/Opinion Research since Huckabee, Mitch Daniels, and Trump bowed out of the race, Giuliani received 16 percent support, ahead of Mitt Romney, who had 15 percent. Following Romney were Sarah Palin (likewise, a non-candidate so far) with 13 percent, Ron Paul with 12 percent, and Herman Cain at 10 percent.

Of course, polls can be fickle. But if they have indicated one thing consistently, it's that Republican voters were not at all happy with their choices, a sentiment shared by even die-hard Republicans like Roger Ailes. Some 39 percent said they were "not very satisfied" or "not satisfied at all" with the current choices, against 26 percent making those responses in May 2007. Politico reports that CNN Polling Director Keating Holland said that even though Giuliani has the top spot in the twelve candidate field, his presence in the race is not exactly a ray of hope.

"Only about a quarter of Republicans nationwide said that they would be enthusiastic if Giuliani won the nomination. But he's not alone β€” only a quarter would be enthusiastic if Palin got the party's nod, and only one in five would feel the same way if Romney became the GOP's standard bearer in 2012."

Giuliani has said in the past that he'll leave "the door open" for a run for the Republican nomination in 2012 if it looks like no one else can beat President Obama. Earlier this week, Congressman Peter King told a group of reporters that Giuliani "is very close to saying he's going to run," though political pundits maintained he was by no means actively pursuing the candidacy. A close associate of Giuliani told ABC News, β€œHe is still thinking about it and is even going back to New Hampshire next week, but has still not made up his mind and no deadline to do so yet.”

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.