Osama Bin Laden Our President, in the blink of an eye, has gone from a hyper-criticized, seemingly-swamped possibly-one-term leader to an American hero, a commander-in-chief who calmly oversaw the killing of the greatest mass murderer in American history. Josh Green has thoughts about what this means, long-term.

What does this mean for the Middle East? Quite a bit. America's friends -- I'm thinking of the Israelis, and the Saudis (who just saw their most hated, and threatening, son, neutralized by a U.S. that constantly seems to be saving the Saudis from existential challenges) -- will be forced to grapple with the demands of a newly-empowered President. If Obama can pivot from this historic moment to the Israeli-Arab peace process; to the task of finishing the job in Libya; to the important work of countering the influence of Islamists in crucial states such as Egypt; to defusing the crisis in Bahrain; he will do a world of good for the cause of justice.

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