Michael Cohen, the Donald Trump adviser who traveled to Iowa last week in a private jet, tells ABC News he broke no campaign finance laws or regulations. His explanation: He wasn't there representing Trump, but as the co-creator of ShouldTrumpRun.com.

Many (including me) assumed the trip may have violated campaign finance rules because it was reportedly paid for by a corporate donor, appearing to exceed contribution limits. Here's Cohen's full statement to ABC:

"Numerous press articles have been circulated questioning the alleged violation of FEC rules/regs stemming from my usage of one of Mr. Trump's aircrafts used on my trip to Iowa. For the record, which I hope will be the last I hear of this nonsense, no FEC rules/regs have been violated as my trip was not for Mr. Trump but as the co-creator of ShouldTrumpRun.com. ShouldTrumpRun.com is an independent Web site paid for by myself and Stewart Rahr. Mr. Trump is not a candidate and has stated this more than 1,000 times, including that he will not make a decision to run until June. Lastly, usage of the aircraft was paid for by Mr. Rahr. I have vetted this issue with two highly-respected specialists in campaign finance law who both agree that no violation could be construed based upon the legitimate facts. The act of filing the inquiry by one of Ron Paul's henchman is nothing more than proof positive of their concern that their candidate could not win the GOP nomination if Trump elects in June to enter the race. As ShouldTrumpRun.com continues to grow, and continues to cause concern to the other candidates, I suspect that more attempts to disparage Mr. Trump may be forthcoming."

Read the full story from ABC's Michael Falcone.

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