Remembering Lieberman's Career Through Jon Stewart

Joe Lieberman is retiring. As with every politician, he means different things to different people, but the senator from Connecticut holds a special place in the hearts of liberals, who disdain him to no end.

Just two years after he ran as John Kerry's vice-presidential nominee, liberals in Connecticut tried to oust him from the Senate in 2006, angry at Lieberman over his support for the Iraq war. They succeeded, only to see him rise again, defeating Democratic nominee Ned Lamont in the general election as an independent.

More recently, Lieberman was the villain of the health-care process, as far as any public-option supporter is concerned. For months, the balance of votes in the Senate was so precarious that Lieberman wielded enormous power. In the most frustrating moment for liberals, Lieberman backed out of a compromise deal he had sealed with Harry Reid to let Americans over 55 buy into Medicare, as opposed to more aggressive coverage-expanding mechanisms like the public option or the trigger mechanism favored by Olympis Snowe. When Lieberman announced his withdrawal, health care fell apart yet again, before finally coming together in less aggressive form.

As a consequence, liberals will remember Lieberman most vividly through Jon Stewart's impressions, oft compared to Droopy Dog, always bejowled and pessimistic in Stewart's renditions. Find below some greatest hits.

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