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Just in time for the inflamed politics and violence debate, a South Carolina gun company has reportedly announced the sale of limited edition semi-automatic rifle components with an inscription of the words "you lie," prominently displayed. The quote, of course, comes from Joe Wilson, the South Carolina congressman who became famous for shouting the words at the president during a speech on health care reform.

Though the advertisement, which included a photograph of Wilson posing with a rifle, has already been taken down, it was up just long enough for Columbia, South Carolina weekly The Free Times to capture a screen shot and various bloggers to express their shock.


  • Raw Story's Stephen Webster: "There's something to be said for poorly timed remarks, but it's another thing to display a flagrantly insensitive contempt for political realities."
A pretty remarkable atmosphere in which to be asked to come together on a bipartisan basis to express regrets over the shooting of a fellow Member. But there we are. The vote originally scheduled for today, on what the Republicans helpfully named the 'Job-Killing Health Care Law Repeal Act,' will be postponed to next Wednesday, when everyone will apparently be comfortable talking about killing again.
And even as Wilson, his words and image are being used to sell the limited edition, his spokesman is claiming that the Congressman is absolutely impotent when it comes to the control of his image. Somehow, I don't buy that. I suspect that Wilson is thrilled at the thin veil of deniability and even more excited about the awesome gangsta street cred a weapon stamped with his jerk mark gives him at Republican Confederate Party meetings and in gatherings of the Tea Party on their carefully manicured astroturfed lawns.
  • Washington Monthly's Steve Benen: "It's distressing enough that far-right activists wanted to make Wilson a hero for his ridiculous outburst, but it's quite a bit worse when "You lie" makes its way onto a commemorative assault rifle components." Benen notes that the advertisement clarifies that the component has no affiliation or endorsement from the congressman. "I'm glad," responds Benen. "But if Wilson could perhaps criticize the commemorative product, that'd be nice, too."
  • Doug Mataconis at Outside the Beltway: "What's next, a Bobby Kennedy Commemorative target?"

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