Henry Hudson, the Virginia-based federal judge who recently ruled against President Obama's new health care law, used to (and, who knows, maybe still does) have a penchant for Hollywood work.

Scanning his 2007 memoir, "Quest for Justice," for proof that Hudson's ruling was motivated by a desire for media attention, the liberal watchdogs at Media Matters have compiled a clip file of excerpts, which includes the following reminiscences of his work on the TV show "The Marshal" shortly after Hudson served as director of the U.S. Marshals Service in President George H.W. Bush's Department of Justice:

Not long after I left as director of the Marshals Service, [Don] Johnson called me with another production idea--a television adventure series portraying a fugitive-hunting deputy marshal. He invited me to assist with the production and serve as a technical advisor for the series. I jumped at the opportunity....The central character was a young deputy marshal named Winston MacBride based in Los Angeles, with an eye-catching wife and two boisterous kids. MacBride tracked fugitives using his brains. He was sharp and resourceful, employing logic, common sense, a variety of high-tech gadgets, and a dash of chicanery to collar his prey. To play MacBride, Don Johnson recruited Jeff Fahey, riding high after costarring with Kevin Costner in Wyatt Earp. Weekly episodes of "The Marshal" featured some tease and innuendo, but scant sex and minimal violence. Some were slightly 'si-fi.' ...

The pilot was well-received by Paramount, the network, and the viewers, and got superb reviews. Rival networks responded by beefing up their offerings for the time slot. Originally scheduled for Monday night, "The Marshal" was eventually shifted to Saturday, up against a Chuck Norris production. Over time, our numbers declined. After two seasons, we got the ax, and Don Johnson's attention shifted to his new role as Nash Bridges, a San Francisco detective. ...

At first, I was enamored with the seductive and seemingly romantic lifestyle of the film business. It was fun to have lunch with Don Johnson and Melanie Griffith at Planet Hollywood, or dinner at a posh restaurant. As a result of working on "The Marshal," Paramount and others hired me to consult on several production concepts in development. However, life in Hollywood is tough for all but the top-tiered actors. For Jeff Fahey, it was feast or famine...He and I have stayed in touch. Today, he operates his own production company and we've collaborated on another television series we hope to have in production in the future. ...

I'm not saying these anecdotes back up Media Matters' ideas about Hudson and his motives, but unless you've followed Hudson's career or know a lot of federal judges with a taste for show business, it's at least mildly amusing to picture a black-robed guy with so much responsibility giving script advice to Don Johnson.

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