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Illegal immigrants can get in-state tuition at California colleges if they graduated from a high school in the state, the California Supreme Court ruled. "The ruling is the first of its kind in the nation," the Los Angeles Times' Maura Dolan and Larry Gordon report, and though just ten other states offer such benefits, this ruling makes challenges to those laws less likely.

"Those who oppose the policy say the state is giving Brownie points for being an illegal immigrant," Dolan and Gordon write. Federal law forbids illegal aliens from getting residency-based school benefits that other citizens can't have; California officials say the state is following that rule by allow citizens whose parents live in other states get in-state tuition if they attended three years of California high school.

  • A Good Outcome for Society, The San Francisco Chronicle argues. "Legal arguments are one thing. The social needs are another. The law was conceived as a way to bring illegal students into the educational and societal mainstream. These students in many cases have grown up here, and it makes no sense to deny them a chance to advance in the workforce, contribute to the state's growth and emerge from the shadows."
  • A Blow to an Immigration Hardliner, Elise Foley notes at The Washington Independent. "A legal challenge was led by Kris Kobach, secretary of state-elect for Kansas and an immigration hardliner who helped draft Arizona’s SB 1070 immigration law. Kobach attempted a similar legal challenge against in-state tuition for undocumented students in Kansas, but that lawsuit failed in 2009. This time, Kobach won the lawsuit in the first round, but the state Supreme Court now shut down his effort."
  • Expect a Federal Impact, Michelle Malkin writes. "Two years ago, immigration enforcement activists scored a victory in a lower California court challenge to the state’s illegal aien student tuition-discount scheme. The lower court ruled that California’s version of the DREAM Act conflicted with federal immigration law. The open-borders state bureaucrats appealed. And now, they’ve scored their own win on behalf of illegal alien students. The ruling from the California Supreme Court this morning upholds the law. It was expected. Kris Kobach, the immigration enforcement attorney who recently won election to the Kansas Secretary of State position, plans to appeal to the US Supreme Court. Meanwhile back on Capitol Hill, planning for the federal illegal alien student bailout proceeds. Get ready."
  • California Is a Neo-Colonial State, Aaron Gee writes at American Thinker. "California imports more cheap labor from a third world country than any other state. California exports her prisoners. The state of California essentially outsources a substantial amount of its energy production, importing more of its electricity than any other state. If California were a country, the liberals in academia would be outraged at this neocolonial behavior.  Ironically it has been liberal policies that have lead to California becoming a neocolonial state. The heart of liberal illegal immigrant friendly policies, like the sanctuary cities, In-state tuition for illegal immigrants , and state subsidized medical care is supposed to be compassion.  If one were to don the mantle of a traditional academic, and California were a western country, an observer would note that the number one driver for the illegal immigrant policies is that rich Californians want cheap housekeepers and gardeners."

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