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Last week's release of ex-Obama administration "car czar" Steven Rattner's book "Overhaul" came bundled with one strategically placed leak intended to drum up buzz: Rahm Emanuel saying "Fuck the UAW [United Auto Workers union]." The backlash to the throwaway line, which garnered predictable reactions from Beltway pundits, appeared to dissipate during the Labor Day weekend daze. Liberal gadfly Michael Moore, however, wasn't going to let that one slide.

In an article for The Daily Beast, Moore declares a "Happy F---ing Labor Day" to you, Rahm, before railing against Obama's White House Chief of Staff in a 1,200 word expletive-filled screed. While the filmmaker admits that he "likes" Emanuel, he can't understand why Rahm would choose to target organized "working people" in such a way. "Maybe Rattner got confused because you [Rahm] drop a lot of F-bombs," Moore mused. Here are the highlights from his history lesson/tirade:

On the importance of the UAW:


In fact, they were often overheard to say, "Fuck the UAW!!!" That's because the UAW had beaten one of the world's biggest industrial corporations when they won their battle on February 11, 1937, 44 days after they'd taken over the GM factories in Flint. Inspired by their victory, workers struck almost every other fucking industry, and union after union was born. Had World War II not begun and had FDR not died, there would have been an economic revolution that would have given everyone—everyone—a fucking decent life.

Why no one should say "F*** the UAW":


Unions got scared and beaten down, a frat boy became president and, like a drunk out of control, spent all our fucking money and our children's money, too. Fuck.
And now your assistant's grandma has to work at fucking McDonald's. Ask her for pictures of what the middle-class life used to look like. It was effing cool! I'll bet grandma doesn't say "Fuck the UAW!"

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