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Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck are rendezvousing in Alaska this Saturday to commemorate 9/11. The event will likely share some similarities to Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally in DC. But with one important difference:

This one costs attendees. Tickets for the event range from a low of $73.75 per person (including taxes and fees) to a high of $225, for a spot in the arena and participation in a 'meet and greet.' There was no indication to whom or what the proceeds will go.

The costly ticket price has some on the left accusing Beck and Palin of profiting off 9/11:

  • What's the $$$ For? asks libertarian blogger Doug Mataconis at Outside the Beltway: "Charging for a 9/11 rally does sound odd, although presumably at least a portion of the ticket price is going toward facility rental. Nonetheless, if I was putting out that much money for a political rally I’d want to know where the profits were going."

  • Shameful, writes Huffington Post contributor Bob Cesca on his blog: "These people ought to be ashamed on themselves. Unless the proceeds are going to the families of the victims (who Glenn Beck hates), I can't think of anything more gratuitous and shameless -- other than, perhaps, a 'genuine slivers of Ground Zero' mail order business." Lee Fang at Think Progress adds, "In addition to using September 11th as a launching pad to score political points, the right is now using the day to rake in cash."

  • Don't Raise a Stink Just Yet, writes Christian Heinze at GOP12: "It seems a bit unseemly to charge for an event like this, but the devil or angel will be in the details of where that money goes."

  • This Is a Patriotic Event, writes Sarah Palin on her Facebook page: "We can count on Glenn to make the night interesting and inspiring, and I can think of no better way to commemorate 9/11 than to gather with patriots who will 'never forget.'"

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