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"It's not often that I agree with Attorney General Eric Holder," writes neoconservative columnist Charles Krauthammer of the Obama administration official. "But, then again, it's not often that Holder publicly embraces an anti-terrorism measure I proposed 48 hours earlier."

In a recent column, Krauthammer had argued for the expansion of the "public safety exception" to the policy of immediately informing suspects of their Miranda rights before interrogation. The exception, several decades old, allows suspects to be questioned about "any immediate danger" before being Mirandized. Krauthammer thinks authorities should be allowed to question terrorists like would-be Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad about any "other possible plots" as well.

As it turns out, Holder and much of the Obama administration seems to think so, too.


Two days later, Eric Holder said this on ABC: "If we are going to have a system that is capable of dealing in a public safety context with this new threat [international terrorism], I think we have to give serious consideration to at least modifying that public safety exception."

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