There is a much better way to spend your afternoon than wondering whether Mike Allen is too powerful, and I'm here to help you find it. A few weeks ago, the New Yorker published an extraordinary piece of journalism by my colleague Jeffrey Goldberg.

American conservationists named Mark and Delia Owens have been the subject of glowing profiles for their efforts to eliminate elephant and meat poaching in Zambia. Their story is much more complicated, and Goldberg has spent years tracking it down. It takes 17,000 words to tell, but the payoff is worth it.


You don't need to have the mental aptitude to reference Joseph Conrad's imperial character, Mr. Kurtz, to appreciate the moral quandaries faced by just about everyone Jeffrey encountered. It's a tale of wealth and deprivation, conscience and character, Kantian absolutes and, quite possibly, murder.

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