File this one under "Story Most Likely to be Written Off as an April Fool's Joke--But Isn't": George W. Bush will headline the American Wind Energy Association's annual convention in Dallas next month. This must seem odd those who think of Bush strictly as a swaggering Texas oilman. But buried beneath all the other stuff in Bush's record is a green streak that developed when he was governor of Texas, which I touched on in a big clean energy story in the Atlantic last year:

Though it will have to compete for space in his obituary, George W. Bush, encouraged by Texas businessmen, signed what is regarded as a model renewable-energy standard while governor of Texas, in 1999; Texas easily beat it and now produces more wind power than Denmark.

Bush plans to talk about his experience pushing wind energy in Texas, and what he says should be well worth listening to. With the prospects for major federal climate legislation all but dead, the action is moving to the states, where Bush has to be counted as--man, it feels weird to say write this!--a true pioneer and a success.

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