Golf Digest reports, in an upcoming article, that President Obama and former President Bill Clinton both called Tiger Woods, personally, to express their support for the embattled golf superstar. See the full article here (jumped to the page that mentions Obama and Clinton).

Golf Digest doesn't say when Obama made the call, but he must have taken some time out from the busy business of health care to make it.

What's more intriguing is Clinton's call, since it wouldn't be the first Clinton made to a famous person caught cheating: he made a call to John Edwards after news of that affair broke, according, that is, to Edwards aide/bean-spiller Andrew Young, basically to say, "How'd you get caught?"

UPDATE: Golf Digest says President Obama did not call Woods; the error resulted in a misunderstanding between the magazine's reporter and a source.

Golf Digest Executive Director of Public Relations Meg D'Incecco e-mails this statement:

An article in the April issue of Golf Digest incorrectly reported that President Obama made a personal call to Tiger Woods to offer encouragement.
Our mistake was due to a misunderstanding between the writer and a trusted source. We regret the error.

The magazine does, however, stand by its reporting that former President Bill Clinton called Woods.

UPDATE 2: Golf Digest offers another correction: Clinton did not call Woods either.

Clinton and Woods did speak over the phone, and Clinton wished Woods well, but it was Woods who had called Clinton--on "something unrelated"--not the other way around, the magazine says.

Golf Digest had previously stood by the assertion that Clinton had called Woods, after it corrected the assertion that Obama had called the golf star.

D'Incecco e-mails this further correction:

Correction: An earlier version of this story posted online (and published in the April issue of Golf Digest) had two errors. We incorrectly reported that President Obama made a personal call to Tiger Woods to offer encouragement. Though the president commented publicly, that call never occurred. The story also stated that President Clinton called Woods to offer personal support. Upon further reporting, we found that Mr. Clinton had "wished him well" in a telephone conversation, but that it was Woods who had placed the call to Mr. Clinton on "something unrelated," according to the former president's spokesman, Matt McKenna. Our mistakes in both cases were due to a misunderstanding between the writer and a trusted source. We regret the errors.

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