How are independents feeling as the 2010 election season approaches? They haven't made up their minds yet, but they dislike Democrats less than they do Republicans, according to a to a new poll.

Of the independents polled in Colorado, New Hampshire, and Nevada by Benenson Strategy on behalf of the Service Employees International Union for a survey released Monday afternoon, 32 percent said they'll vote for a Democrat, 33 percent said they'll vote for a Republican, and 34 percent were unsure.

And they didn't like either party's performance in Congress, but a clear advantage went to Democrats: independents: Dems collected a 33 percent approval/64 percent disapproval rating; Republicans, 26 percent approval/71 percent disapproval.

The three states where the poll was conducted will see three competitive Senate races this fall, including Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's reelection campaign in Nevada.

What do these swing-state independents dislike most about Congress? Apparently it's "members of both parties ... putting their own individual interest ahead of what's best for the country": 76 percent said it bothered them a great deal (respondents were split almost evenly on which party bothers them more in this area).

And they want Congress to do something on health care: 69 percent of Independents said that health care is "an urgent problem that requires immediate action" or "serious problem that should be dealt with as soon as possible"--though 63 percent said Democrats had cut "too many deals with special interest groups such as pharmaceutical companies" as a prime complaint with health reform.

Benenson polled 600 independents Feb. 14-20 and 25 for the survey.


Thumbnail photo credit: David McNew/Getty Images

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