It had brought them nothing but trouble since they announced it, and now Democrats will not use the "deem and pass" strategy after all.

House Democrats said they would hold separate votes on the Senate bill and the package of "fixes" to it, mulitple news outlets reported Saturday.

The move will force Democrats to vote on the Senate bill, which is less popular among the caucus without the package of desired fixes; it reinforces the need for House Democrats to trust their Senate counterparts to pass the reconciliation fixes, with the Senate bill now passed by both chambers on its own; it also means Republicans won't be able to launch a legal challenge, as had been discussed, challenging the constitutionality of health care reform.

If Democrats succeed in passing health reform this way, there will be far less baggage involved after it's done.

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