Things are not looking good for President Obama in the swing state of Ohio: his approval there has dipped even further, according to a Quinnipiac poll released today.

Quinnipiac puts Obama well into negative territory--44% approve, 52% disapprove--which is significantly worse than Rasmussen's numbers (49% approve, 51% disapprove). Today's Quinnipiac numbers are, however, only three points worse than the same pollster's numbers on Obama in Ohio from November (45% approve, 50% disapprove).

Winning Ohio essentially clinched the nomination for President Obama two Novembers ago; now, it seems Ohio is frustrated with Obama on the economy and health care--respondents said they want reform but didn't like the current plan (whatever that meant between Feb. 16 and 21, when Quinnipiac conducted the poll...and it means something different now after Obama announced his own proposal Monday). Some more detailed findings:

Ohio voters give Obama a negative 39 - 57 percent approval for handling the economy, and a negative 34 - 58 on his handling of health care.  Voters approve 55 - 39 percent of Obama's decision to send 30,000 additional troops to Afghanistan.

Voters mostly disapprove 56 - 33 percent of the current health care reform plan, but say 53 - 44 percent that Obama and Congress should keep trying to pass reform legislation.

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