That's the question raised by the 2012-GOP-watch blog Race 4 2012 in relaying the news that Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) will publish a book, co-written by conservative author Peter Schweizer, in July of 2010. The book, already listed on Amazon, will be entitled "On Solid Ground: Returning to America's Core Values."

It appears to pursue a hybrid between the two book-writing models used by Mitt Romney and Sarah Palin: the idea-driven ideology or policy book (Romney's "No Apology: The Case for American Greatness) and the personal memoir (Palin's "Going Rogue: An American Life"). Here's Amazon's product description of Jindal's book:

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal is not only a rising star in the GOP but has been touted as the future face of the Republican Party. In his new book, Jindal tells his own inspiring story and reveals his plan for putting conservatives and America back on solid ground. Blending his personal story, including his conversion to Christianity and his unprecedented political career, with an account of his local and national governmental successes, Jindal offers a bold vision for renewing the GOP and our nation. From health care and national debt to how we can fundamentally transform Washington, Jindal tackles controversial issues and offers fresh solutions. Insightful and inspiring, On Solid Ground provides the leadership voice Republicans seek and the guidance America needs.

Jindal was once viewed as a serious contender--at one point, for a split second, maybe, possibly even a frontrunner--for the GOP nomination in 2012. That all came crashing down with his panned response to President Obama's first State of the Union address (which wasn't actually a State of the Union address, as Obama had just taken office weeks earlier--it was dubbed an address to a joint session of Congress--but the GOP felt the need to put up a response anyway, and, despite the severe disadvantage of having to follow the incredibly hot act of President Obama, on top of the always-impossible position of responding to a State of the Union, Jindal was cut no slack).

Since his national political star rose, and fell, Jindal has been considered a policy whiz in the GOP, rising through Louisiana's state government at an impressively young age. Writing a book seems to be the mark of presidential ambitions--Romney, Palin, and Mike Huckabee have all published and toured to promote books in the last year--and it will be interesting to see just how much policy is included in this book, and whether or not his publicity rollout constitutes an aggressive move back onto the national political scene.

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