Two Senate Democrats who represent swing votes on health care are also up for reelection in 2010, and polls commissioned by a liberal campaign group show they could be in trouble if they vote with Republicans to block health reform that contains a public option.

The Progressive Campaign Change Committee, a group dedicated to electing liberal lawmakers, has released polls testing the health care waters for Sens. Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) and Evan Bayh (D-IN), and both surveys, conducted by Research 2000, show that Democrats and independents will be less likely to support them in 2010 if they join a filibuster.

In Arkansas, 49 percent of Democrats say they'll be less likely to vote for Lincoln if she helps block a public option, while  7 percent would be more likely to vote for her; 35 percent of independents, meanwhile, would be less likely to support her, vs. 10 percent who would like the move.

In Indiana, Bayh would face 51 percent of disgruntled Democratic voters, vs. 7 percent who would be more likely to support him for blocking a public option. Independents want him to vote against a GOP filibuster 35 percent to 13 percent.

According to the polls, residents of both states support the public option: in Arkansas, by a margin of 56 percent to 37 percent; in Indiana, 52 to 42.

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