From my Twitter panel, 140-word explanations of President Obama's drop in the polls. The respondents are liberal, conservative and other.

Obama's numbers are down because people are uncertain about (and being lied to about) health care reform. To raise them, he needs to pass a good bill and have it take effect and make a difference in lives (might take a while). (@marginofterror)

He's lost positive messaging. He speaks ill of those who oppose him, which translates to speaking ill of real voters. (@maybeetweet)

Simple: Failure to achieve the objectives for which he was hired. People are finally looking past the hype. (@mobiusinformer)

His inability to control the debate allowed the Rs to get attention, O is spending time retorting instead of stating his facts (@whpatterson)

POTUS omits/remains foggy on policy details, so Repubs [are] the ones crafting perceptions of his agenda. 2. GIVE DETAILS. (@rhawd)

GOP is better at vocalizing its message. Dems are all over the place, thus hurting Pres. Have consistent message, raise #s.

The nation is right of center, and he has contracted out his policies to the left (pelosi, Waxman, Frank)

Fatigue, media over-saturation, and the lack of one clear, identifiable accomplishment that benefits the average American. (@tdominey)

1 his healthcare sell round 1 was too wonky and not so accessible. 2 unemployment #s - public has immed gratification need (@othercorner)

Obama's learned that campaigning & governing are quite different. The former=popularity contest; The latter=tough choices (@westwingreport)

POTUS must play small-ball and form a new coalition of Ds & Rs outside the control of the Democratic leadership in Congress. (@ragley)

Got an OFA email touting 60,000 volunteers (?!?). Current untold story is cratering of lefty support as he fumbles on HC. (@macartney)

Legislative overreach. The rescue bills had to be passed quickly, but he rushed the country on health care. (@hamptonSteens)

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