Today we asked whether the health care debate has given you, the reader, more or less faith in American democracy. Consensus in the comments section seems to be less. Some responses:

From PorkBelly:

Less.

Media has been pathetic in pointing out falsehoods from anti-reform groups.

Screaming at town halls to try and dominate the debate.

Depresses me everytime I read about it.

From Pineview1997:

Less. But then the Senate was designed to be a brake on popular democracy. Another mission accomplished by old, white, slaveholders.

Zing. From Kobayashi Maru:

My reflex is to say "less faith." But if health insurance reform passes even after these heated and often factually-challenged town hall meetings, then I'd say "more faith."

From Mark Coats:

What passes for "American Democracy" is a one-dollar-one-vote system where politicians depend on the money of very powerful concentrations of private power to get elected and re-elected. Therefore, it shouldn't be surprising that the healthcare debate doesn't include the consideration of any of the types of healthcare delivery systems that have proven effective in the rest of the developed world.

The Atlantic Politics Channel asks a question every day...feel free to weigh in at your leisure.

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