Politics Daily columnist Jill Lawrence spends "Nineteen Minutes In A Car With Harry Reid" for an article posted this morning. Reid is leading a political "double life," Lawrence writes: he's one of the most powerful people in Washington, but at home his poll numbers are sagging. The chairwoman of the state GOP led him by six percentage points in a recent poll on Reid's 2010 reelection contest, and he may have dodged a bullet when Rep. Dean Heller (R), who could have posed an even more serious threat, decided not to run. He's at the forefront of a national Democratic movement that could be shade too liberal for Nevadan palates (though Nevada voted for President Obama 55 percent to 43 in November). In addition to telling Lawrence that the Senate will pass both energy legislation and a health care overhaul, here's what Reid had to say about that double life:

Reid said his own low ratings have to do with Nevada's mushrooming population - 600,000 newcomers in the last dozen years. "Most people don't know me," he said. "All they see is me fighting (former president George W.) Bush on the war, privatization of Social Security. They see me as a real partisan. My career in Nevada has been made on my being a moderate. People don't know where I was born, how I was raised, what I had to do to get where I am now, and we're going to tell that story."

The story involves growing up poor without indoor plumbing, and Reid anticipates having $25 million to tell it. He had raised nearly $11 million as of June 30, and had $7 million on hand.

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