It has not been lost on many that Ted Kennedy's death came at a moment when the cause he described as the greatest one of his public life -- universal health care -- seems to be stumbling just short of the goal line. Kennedy's absence has been felt all year on Capitol Hill, and there are many on both sides who believe that health reform might be closer to becoming a reality if he had been in any shape to bring his negotiating skills to bear. So what effect will his passing have on the prospects for health reform? Will his mourning colleagues suddenly be inspired to put aside their long-standing partisan and ideological differences, to get it done as a tribute to him, with the bill named in his honor, as many have suggested?...

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