The Democratic National Committee continues its assault on GOP lawmakers for their "refusal" to offer a budget proposal. A statement this morning from DNC spokesman Hari Sevugan:

"Thirty-one days ago, the President put forward a plan to turn the economy around, make health care more affordable, reduce our dependence on foreign sources of oil and invest in our nation's schools.  Since that time, the Republican party has offered a chorus of criticism and a bevy of excuses, but they have failed to offer a budget proposal of their own.
 
The lack of urgency displayed by the Republican party at this time of national crisis is shocking.  Republican leadership is, in a manner of speaking, watching Britney fiddle while the economy burns. 
 
After a month of stalling and glossy but empty pamphlets, it's time for the Republican leadership to stop saying 'No' and start contributing.  The American people can't afford any more Republican excuses."

This raises a semantic point: did the House GOP actually offer a budget proposal? It was a proposal, alright, but it was only 19 pages. Then again, if Republicans did offer something more, it's not as if Democrats would jump to adopt their plan.

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