Obama campaign manager David Plouffe writes to Obama supporters today:

"I wanted you to be the first to hear the news. At the Democratic National Convention next month, we're going to kick off the general election with an event that opens up the political process the same way we've opened it up throughout this campaign. Barack has made it clear that this is your convention, not his. On Thursday, August 28th, he's scheduled to formally accept the Democratic nomination in a speech at the convention hall in front of the assembled delegates. Instead, Barack will leave the convention hall and join more than 75,000 people for a huge, free, open-air event where he will deliver his acceptance speech to the American people. It's going to be an amazing event, and Barack would like you to join him. Free tickets will become available as the date approaches, but we've reserved a special place for a few of the people who brought us this far and who continue to drive this campaign. If you make a donation of $5 or more between now and midnight on July 31st, you could be one of 10 supporters chosen to fly to Denver and spend two days and nights at the convention, meet Barack backstage, and watch his acceptance speech in person. Each of the ten supporters who are selected will be able to bring one guest to join them. "


Analysis:

(1) Good luck trying to find a hotel room anywhere near Denver....

(2) Why the formal announcement today? Certainly, the campaign noticed that John McCain would be in the city for a town hall, but I suspect that they also wanted to get this news out to tamp down stories of tension between the campaign and the DNC.

(3) I've gotten this question a lot: Having decided to opt out of the public financing system for the general election, is Obama having trouble raising money? No, say Obama sources. They won't divulge totals or estimates but I am led to believe that the spigot is open and the currency is flowing nicely...

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