Already this offseason, the weak dollar and the strong Euro have changed the traditional pro basketball balance of power with a number of foreign players either opting to head for Europe or else (Tiago Splitter) stay over there despite offers to come to the states. Top superstars can earn more in the United States, but for lesser players the calculation's not quite clear and in certain instances you can make more money in Europe. And then yesterday Josh Childress became the first American to do something similar.

As a restricted free agent in a market where nobody has cap space, he had no way to earn more than the midlevel exemption unless Atlanta decided to feel generous. So he took an offer from Olympiakos in Greece that's worth more. If this trend continues, I wonder if it might not lead to more talented 18 year-olds seeking to go to Europe to earn money in exchange for their work rather than obeying the terms of the American sports cartel and working for free for a year or three in college.

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