Good description from Megan McArdle:

Aspen is a monumental shrine to wealth, clothed in the false modesty of a self-conscious homage to America's small town past. It is the Potemkin Village of the post-consumer culture. The place always puts me in mind of the "American" restaurants abroad--it looks like a diner, and the menu sounds like a diner, but when the food comes the chili cheesedog is made with bratwurst and limburger, and they've slathered your french fries with mayonnaise.



But the mountains are really beautiful.

Of course with "American" restaurants you never know. Back in 1997 at least, Buffalo Bill's in Prague was serviceable tex-mex at a time when the Czech Republic was not offering a ton of edible cuisine. Eleven years later I imagine things are very different, though.

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