Dana Goldstein looks at some important positive aspects of the legacy of Hillary Clinton's campaign:

Over the course of this historic, thrilling, aggressive primary election, we've seen more female pundits than ever before writing and speaking about presidential politics. We've experienced unprecedented interest from male politicos in women's participation in the electoral process. And demands for women's leadership have been given their fairest hearing to date in the United States, with Democrats nationwide expecting Obama to give close consideration to female vice-presidential prospects -- not only because there are a few wildly successful and talented women who would be great at the job, but also as a gesture of good will toward the feminist energy that animated so many Clinton supporters.



This is all true. Beyond the Vice Presidency, I would imagine that an Obama transition team is now really going to want to be able to say that it's appointed the highest number of woman to cabinet positions.

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