It's sometimes difficult for someone like me to remember that many people -- most of them in fact -- don't get the bulk of their political news from the internet and haven't ever watched a political video on YouTube or Brightcove. Still, the pace of the growth remains extremely impressive.

For now, though, we're in an interesting middle ground where for a wide swathe of people online media is a hugely important slice of our information diet. For others, though, it's as if it doesn't exist at all. Consequently, there's a lot of opportunity for very segmented messaging. And in an election cycle where we also seem to be looking at a lot of age polarization in political allegiance, this can wind up having huge impacts. Obama can, for example, use the internet to do "base-energizing" stuff knowing that this will reach a huge proportion of his supporters while also remaining invisible to large groups of other voters who he may want to be courting in different ways.

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