Moments after I posted a link to a new Hillary Clinton radio ad in South Carolina featuring Magic Johnson implying that Obama is a "hyped...rookie..." several Obama spokesfolks responded with a ream of statistics and video clips pointing out how Johnson was one of the awesomest rookies ever.... so which lucky Obama researcher got to spend time surfing the sports sites today?

Magic Johnson Became The First Rookie In 11 Years To Start In The NBA All Star Game And The First Rookie To Win The NBA Finals MVP. “In 77 games Johnson's numbers mirrored those of his days at Michigan State (18.0 ppg, 7.7 rpg, 7.3 apg). He became the first rookie to start in an NBA All-Star Game since Elvin Hayes 11 years earlier.” Johnson also became “the first rookie ever to win the Finals MVP Award.” [NBA.com, Accessed: 12/18/07]

Johnson’s MVP-Winning Performance in 1980 Playoffs Game 6 Is “The Stuff of Legend,” Saved the Team From a Hometown Loss When The Star Abdul-Jabbar Was Injured. “In the 1980 NBA Finals against the Philadelphia 76ers, Johnson's performance in the series-clinching sixth game was the stuff of legend. Abdul-Jabbar was sidelined with a badly sprained ankle sustained during his 40-point effort in Game 5. Up 3-2, the Lakers could wrap things up on the 76ers' home court.

Enter Johnson, the 20-year-old rookie. Assuming Abdul-Jabbar's position at center, Johnson sky-hooked and rebounded the Lakers to victory with 42 points, 15 boards, seven assists and three steals. He even jumped for the opening tap. Johnson became the first rookie ever to win the Finals MVP Award. The stunning effort exemplified his uncanny ability to do whatever the Lakers needed in order to win. In the Los Angeles Times, Westhead said of his amazing rookie: ‘We all thought he was a movie-star player, but we found out he wears a hard hat. It's like finding a great orthopedic surgeon who can also operate a bulldozer.’” [NBA.com, Accessed: 12/18/07]



Watch some of that famous game here...



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