Sources say that the Renewal Project, whose organizers are partial to Mike Huckabee, is planning three pastors conferences in Florida, one conference in New Hampshire (scheduled for Dec. 13 and 14) two in South Carolina and at least on in Michigan.

Huckabee's opponents suspect the Project is a campaign adjunct in disguise. Its backers are wealthy and anonymous. Last week in Des Moines, they paid for 350 pastors to stay at downtown hotels, fed them good meals and paid Newt Gingrich's speakers fee.

And only Mike Huckabee was invited to speak.

(The project's organizers insisted that all the other candidates were invited, but, funnily enough, no other candidate seems to have gotten the invitation.)

How will these pastors help Huckabee? T

They can't legally endorse him from the pulpits.

They can, however, distribute voter guides. Problem is: because other candidates have answered questions the same way Huckabee has, for the guides to be effective in moving votes toward Huckabee, they'll have to be revised somehow.

When combined with TrustHuckabee, a 527 that serves as a surrogate paid voter identification and contact effort, Huckabee has the makings of a complete field campaign. And his campaign is paying for none of it.

And short of proof of coordination, it's all legal.

A side note: Yesterday, Pastor Rick Scarborough's "Patriot Pastors" tour was supposed to begin its sojourn through Iowa, although a snowstorm may have postponed the kick-off.

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