Here's Mike Huckabee with a much more banal ad than his earlier Chuck Norris episode:



Ambinder remarks that the faith appeals aren't subtle, but as he says in a follow-up I think there are several subtle appeals to anti-Mormon sentiment here. The "Christian Leader" text seems like an effort to appeal to the notion that Mormons (i.e., Mitt Romney) aren't Christians. Similarly, when he says "I don't have to wake up every day wondering 'what do I need to believe'" he's specifically taking aim at Multiple Choice Mitt. And, indeed, even the distinction between being influenced by faith (which Huckabee rejects) and being defined by it (which he embraces) seems aimed at Romney. Rudy Giuliani's politics are obviously pretty independent on his Catholic faith, since he doesn't agree with them on the issues where the Pope's on the right or on the issues where the Pope's on the left.

Romney, by contrast, has been trying to seize the mantle of faith, noting the shared political principles of Mormons and Evangelical Christians. But Romney can't run a candidacy defined by faith anywhere outside of Utah. I tend to think Andrew's been too quick at times to raise the alarm bells about "Christianism," but with this add Huckabee really does seem to me to be flirting with an argument like "you should vote for me because we have the same theology" rather than a more generic religion-infused moral appeal.

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