I've been wondering for some time now how Mitt Romney would finesse the point that few theologically orthodox Christians consider Mormonism to be a species of Christianity. Byron York kinda sorta got an answer to the question:

Sometimes one forgets that Romney was trained as a lawyer, but not on that day. I tried one more time. “Well, okay, if you have been told that by other people, what is your reaction to the substance of what they are saying?” “You know, the term ‘Christian’ means different things to different people,” Romney told me. “Jews aren’t Christian. That doesn’t preclude a Jew from being able to run for office and become president. I believe that Jesus Christ is the savior of the world and is the son of God. Now, some people say, well, that doesn’t necessarily make you a Christian because Christian refers to a certain group of evangelical Christian faiths. That’s fine. That’s their view. Others say, no, anyone who believes in Jesus Christ as the son of God and the Savior should be called Christian. That’s fine, too. I’ll just describe what I believe and not try to distinguish my faith from others. That’s really something for my faith to do and for the churches amongst themselves to consider.”



Basically, Romney seems to be trying to indicate that he believes he's a Christian (which is the Mormon view) without quite saying so, thus attempting to avoid getting into an argument with people who think that's wrong. Daniel Larison says "this attempt to have it both ways is going to dissatisfy a lot of Christian and Mormon voters alike." It certainly seems more like an argument that liberals would find appealing than one likely to persuade conservatives, but I have no idea how much this kind of thing bothers people. As a non-Christian myself, I'd kind of like to see Romney embrace the non-Christian label and try to break some barriers, but evidently he thinks trying to fudge the difference will work out better for him.

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