Lynn Sweet is one of the more aggressive reporters covering Obama out there, and the campaign isn't generally a huge fan of her work. Here's her lead today:

White House hopeful Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.), who is making government transparency a centerpiece of the latest phase of his campaign, does not always practice what he preaches when it comes to his own business.



More:

Obama campaign manager David Plouffe, in a memo sent last week after the debate, said Obama is "setting a new standard of openness in campaign fund-raising." That's because the bar is very low.

• • Obama's campaign has refused to identify the biggest bundlers, people who are raising at least $200,000 for him and are given membership in his National Finance Council. Obama, as all major candidates, declines most of the time to disclose details about most fund-raising events.

• • During a town hall meeting last month in Dover, N.H., Obama pledged that he would post all meetings he would hold as president on the Internet. As a senator, Obama has never done that.

• • Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) routinely releases a detailed schedule of his Washington, D.C., meetings -- with international leaders, Illinois state and local officials, constituents and lobbyists.



Obama spokesman Bill Burton responds:

"Obama has a record of fighting for openness in government and, as president, he will make dealings in Washington more transparent than they have ever been. During the presidential campaign he has gone further than any other candidate when it comes to transparency in making public his tax returns and his bundlers."

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