Larry Bartels emails Ezra Klein some data about his research on the impact (in terms of statistical correlation) of perceptions of different candidate attributes on voting behavior: "The analysis was based on survey questions asking voters to rate presidential candidates on a variety of dimensions. Here are the estimated effects of those evaluations on voting behavior, averaged over elections from 1980 to 2000. (The numbers are not directly interpretable, but the relative magnitudes are.)" I turned the numbers into a handy chart, showing the average on the left and the 2000 result on the right:

caring.jpg


I'm not really sure what to make of this, though, as I sort of feel like people may tailor the characteristics they say they're looking for to suit the candidate they're going to vote for. Mainly, you want to be strong yet caring. Or caring yet strong.

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