Andrew says this whole topic wouldn't matter if the left would just get rid of affirmative action:

That policy asserts as an irrefutable fact that any racial discrepancies in college selection are a function of either college-imposed or societal racism. Once the left put the blank slate on the table, and actively supported racial discrimination as public policy as a consequence, they begged the question of whether they had the empirical data to back up their social engineering. Over to Will. Abolish affirmative action and these questions can and will become less salient. How about it?



So basically affirmative action proponents take the view that black people suffer from racial discrimination, thus leaving advocates of color blind admissions policies no choice but to argue for the genetic inferiority of black people? I'm not sure I see how that follows. Everybody agrees that African-Americans, on average, score lower on IQ tests than do white people. The question is whether we should see this gap as primarily driven by black people's allegedly inferior genetic stock, or by persistent economic and social inequities.

UPDATE: Incidentally, to restate the obvious, race science aimed at proving the innate intellectual inferiority of black people isn't something that originated in the 1970s and 80s as campaigners against affirmative action sought to bolster their arguments. Nor has it suddenly vanished in California and Texas where they got rid of affirmative action programs.

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