"Ahmadinejad to Speak on Campus" (Columbia Spec)

By the way: I wonder whether the U.S. government considers Ahmadinejad a "head of state" or a "head of government." If it's the latter, the fine folks at the Diplomatic Security Service (DS) will be charged with putting together a protective detail. If he's a head-of-state, then the U.S. Secret Service will, by statute, protect him.

Even when the CIA was figuring out ways to, uh, destabilize the Nicaraguan dictator Tachito Somoza in the 1970s, the Secret Service had the unenviable job of protecting the leader whenever he visited New York.

An an Ahmadinejad protection detail would be larger than your average detail because the potential for threats and dispruptions would be significant.

If precedent holds, the Service or the DS would assign at least several dozen agents, armored cars, counter-sniper details (although the NYPD would help with this), probably a counter-assault team, and probably even an SUV equipped with IED-jamming technology.

Here's a weird scenario: presumably, the American security agents have to liaise with their Iranian counterparts, most of whom are probably connected in some way or another with the Iranian central intelligence and security agency.

So how does the Service protect the Iranians from gaining detailed knowledge of protective methods and coded radio frequencies?

(Whoops! SAVAK no longer exists.)

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