I'm not sure I really ever gave my diavlog with Daniel Drezner a proper plug. I tend to think Dan and I have reasonably different political views, but we wound up with disappointingly little to disagree about. The crux of the problem came when we were discussing the fact that essentially everyone who went to work for Bush wound up with a worse reputation than he had going in. Maybe a few second-tier people (Zelikow, e.g.) have so far escaped unscathed, but the only people to enhance their reputations have been whistle blowers.

Dan called this the "ultimate indictment of Bush," which it really is, but now that we're at a point where most all reasonable people see things this way, what's left to argue about. The best we could really up with was me not buying Alan Greenspan's attempt at an exculpatory confession for his role in the Bush tax cuts rather than a straightforwardly confessional one.

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