For the time being, Gov. Mitt Romney's presidential campaign has stopped airing its television ads on network affiliates in Iowa and New Hampshire, Republicans who traffic in traffic say.

A rotation of ads is still running on cable television channels in those states. But the total volume will be markedly less noticable to television viewers than in July, when Romney's advertising saturated several Iowa television markets.

Republican media sources say the amount of radio commercial time Romney has bought is unchanged.

"We are still broadcasting ads in early primary states," said Kevin Madden, Romney's spokesman. Madden would not provide specifics. However, a Romney source said the change in traffic is "temporary."

Last week, Romney bought commercial time to thank Iowans who gave him his Ames straw poll victory on Aug. 11.

It's not unusual a campaign to pare down its advertising in the dog days of August. Romney's campaign had acknowledged that they would probably try to save a bit of money between the Ames straw poll on August 11th and Labor Day.

Romney's early advertising in Iowa and New Hampshire, his numerous visits to the states, and the mixed fortunes of his rivals are credited with his strong standing in early state polls. To date, the campaign has spent more than $6M on television and radio ads. Romney's ads have aired on cable in other early states, like South Carolina and Florida.

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