I hadn't realized that Charles Krauthammer, America's worst columnist, is in the absurd "pro-choice, anti-Roe" camp:

Legalizing abortion by judicial fiat ( Roe v. Wade) instead of by democratic means has its price. One is that the issue remains socially unsettled. People take to the streets when they have been deprived of resort to legislative action.



I'm always baffled by these claims -- what's the evidence for them? Abortion is a controversial issue in Mexico. It's a controversial issue in Ireland. As best I can tell, it's a controversial issue anywhere you have large religious communities who strongly believe that fetuses have the moral standing of human persons. Which, indeed, is what you would expect topics remain "socially unsettled" for as long as there are major blocks of opinion that have significantly different views about that. Tax policy in the United States, for example, is entirely out of the hands of the courts. Nevertheless, the issue of tax rates hasn't been "settled democratically." Rather, it's the subject of constant legislative and electoral dispute.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.