The Atlantic Interview

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A weekly conversation between editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and the figures shaping society

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  • Episode 23

    Introducing Crazy/Genius: Should We Break Up Amazon?

    Today, we bring you the second episode of our new show Crazy/Genius, hosted by Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson. In this episode, Derek asks if Amazon –  which may soon be the first trillion-dollar company in the history of the world – has become a dangerous monopoly threatening the U.S. economy.
  • Episode 22

    Yossi Klein Halevi

    “I discovered the reality and the power of Palestinian identity by getting a rock thrown at my head.” Israel author Yossi Klein Halevi joins The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg to discuss the conflict in the Middle East and his new book Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor. Halevi shares how he believes Israelis need to both remember that they live in a world where genocide is possible and to remember that they were strangers in the land of Egypt. “And if you don’t have both of those sensibilities, then you are a one-dimensional Jew,” says Halevi.
  • Episode 21

    Pete Souza

    Pete Souza spent eight years photographing the Obama White House, an effort he now chronicles his new book Obama: An Intimate Portrait. Souza joins The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg to share the stories behind his most famous photos: a 5-year-old boy patting the president's head, the tense scene in the Situation Room during the mission against Osama bin Laden, and many more. What was it like to be a fly on the wall in the West Wing?

    (View the photos discussed here.)
  • Episode 20

    Madeleine Albright

    Madeleine Albright considers Donald Trump "the first antidemocratic president in modern U.S. history." Alarmed at the rise in authoritarian tendencies around the world, the former Secretary of State has written a new book, Fascism: A Warning. Twice a refugee of her native Czechoslovakia – first from the Nazi invasion, then later from the Communist coup – Albright is all too familiar with the loss of democracy. In a conversation on stage at Sixth & I with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, Albright shares her thoughts on President Trump, her worries about fascism, and what it’s like to get interrupted by a porn star. 
  • Episode 19

    Michele Norris

    "For decades, examining race in America meant focusing on the advancement and struggles of people of color. Under this framework, being white was simply the default," writes Michele Norris in National Geographic's issue on race. Previously a host of NPR's All Things Considered, Norris is now the Director of The Bridge – the Aspen Institute's new program on race, identity and inclusion – building on her work as the founder of The Race Card Project. She tells The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg that the public clashes over race may get our attention, but they also distract from the private conversations going on across America.
  • Episode 18

    Mitch Landrieu

    "There is a difference between remembrance of history and reverence of it," said New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu in his now-famous speech in May of 2017. As Landrieu said those words, city workers a few blocks away uprooted an enormous statue of Robert E. Lee – the last of four Confederate monuments the mayor removed from the city after a years-long process. In a conversation with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, Landrieu discusses the politics of race in the south, his grappling with history as a white southerner, and his own family’s connection to the story of civil rights in America.
  • Episode 17

    Ta-Nehisi Coates

    The growing prominence of The Atlantic's national correspondent Ta-Nehisi Coates means that he's often asked to comment on matters on which he lacks expertise, but he demurs. In a conversation with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, recorded in front of an audience at South by Southwest in Austin, Coates explains why he isn't interested in interviewing Donald Trump, why he cannot use Twitter ever again, and how his complicated feelings about America inflect his writing for Captain America
  • Episode 16

    Amy Klobuchar

    Amy Klobuchar, the first woman to be elected U.S. Senator from Minnesota, has been been working faithfully toward little victories in Donald Trump's Washington. Now, she's turned her attention toward that unicorn of lawmakers all over the country--a sensible gun bill that can get around the National Rifle Association. She talks to the Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about how this time might be different, and why she is taking Donald Trump at his word. They also discuss her tater tot hotdish recipe. 
  • Episode 15

    Caitlin Flanagan

    Caitlin Flanagan wrote a devastating story about the death of a fraternity pledge at Penn State University for the Atlantic last year, and she has updates on the case for editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg. They discuss why fraternities are still attractive to straight, white, well-off young men on college campuses. Flanagan has also started fighting feminists, with her provocative essays on how some women are turning the #MeToo movement into a racket. She sees some women using the moment to take revenge against individual men while doing nothing to topple the patriarchy. She talks about why millennial women are confused and angry about their sexual encounters. She also says that our fear of toxic masculinity is crowding out an honest look at toxic femininity. 
  • Episode 14

    Bill Gates

    The mission of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to ease suffering around the world may be somewhat at odds with the "America First" sentiments that propelled Donald Trump into the presidency. But Bill Gates is moving ahead with enthusiasm. He tells Jeffrey Goldberg, The Atlantic's editor in chief, why he's still optimistic, and how he feels about no longer being the richest man in the world. 
  • Episode 13

    Steve Coll

    Steve Coll is one of the foremost chroniclers of the war in Afghanistan, now in its eighteenth year. Coll talks with Atlantic editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about why the war has persisted, well after the idea of a military solution lost any luster it might have had. They discuss Pakistan's struggles during the war in Afghanistan, and why disrupting the terrorism networks that now thrive in the area might require much more than just American troops.
  • Episode 12

    Mollie Hemingway

    Mollie Hemingway, a senior editor for the Federalist and Fox News contributor, finds most of the media's histrionics over President Donald Trump to be overblown. While she won't let her kids listen to the president's most vulgar remarks, she's willing to defend his policies and his record, a fact which has cost her some friends. She talks to Jeffrey Goldberg, the Atlantic's editor in chief, about where she finds Trump most effective, and what his successes mean for American politics.
  • Episode 11

    Mike Solomonov

    Israeli chef Mike Solomonov recently won the James Beard Award for outstanding chef. He created the restaurant Zahav in Philadelphia, built a food empire, and expertly hid a drug addiction from everyone in his life. He talks with Jeffrey Goldberg, the Atlantic's editor in chief, about what he felt when his brother was killed, and how the tragedy first fueled and then helped him fight his addiction. Now in a long recovery, he cooks Israeli food as a kind of cultural mission.
  • Episode 10

    Tracy Chou

    The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg revisits a persistent problem in the tech industry: Why is it so difficult for people who aren't white and male? He talks with Tracy Chou, an engineer and long-time veteran of the start-up world whose current work focuses on that problem. She discusses her own experiences with harassment and discrimination, and why those experiences didn't drive her out of tech, as they did for many others.
  • Episode 9

    Robert Siegel

    For thirty years, Robert Siegel has given us the afternoon news. Having started his career in public radio when it was a scrappy enterprise, he's spent the past three decades shaping NPR as host of All Things Considered. He retired this week, at a time when NPR plays a critical role in educating the electorate. Jeffrey Goldberg,   Atlantic’s editor in chief, turns the microphone on Robert Siegel for a change. 
  • Episode 8

    Maggie Haberman

    To make sense of President Donald Trump's first year in the White House, many have come to rely on Maggie Haberman. The powerhouse reporter for the New York Times talks with Atlantic editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about how her career covering New York City politics for the tabloids has given her a unique view of Trump. To Haberman, Trump's brashness and need for approval are partly products of his distinct experience of New York City.
  • Episode 7

    Jonah Goldberg

    Writer Jonah Goldberg talks with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about being a conservative without a party in the age of Donald Trump. Jonah says there are many factors contributing to the dysfunction and paralysis in the Republican Party, and that  thinkers and leaders on the right may have a very small window to fix these problems before the party disintegrates. Jeffrey and Jonah also discuss the experience of waiting in television green rooms.

    Read the transcript
  • Episode 6

    Richard Plepler

    The chairman and CEO of HBO talks with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about what shows he should watch next. They also discuss how HBO has tried to develop a healthy company culture within a highly sexualized industry, the high-stakes business of making great TV, and what happened at the end of the Sopranos.
  • Episode 5

    Nikole Hannah-Jones

    Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief, talks about America's unequal education system with journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones. How much progress has been really made since Brown v. Board of Education in giving black kids access to equal schooling as white kids? Far from enough, Hannah-Jones has found. And she has some concrete—but difficult—ideas for fixing it.

    Read the transcript
  • Episode 4

    Eric Garcetti

    The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with Mayor Eric Garcetti about what people misunderstand about Los Angeles, whether a mayor could win the presidency, and where he goes to find the best tacos.

    Read the Transcript
  • Episode 3

    Masha Gessen

    Author and activist Masha Gessen’s new book about Russia won the 2017 National Book Award for nonfiction. The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with Gessen about what Vladimir Putin wants, what Donald Trump’s election means, and how Americans should think about Russia's interference in 2016.

    Read the transcript.
  • Episode 2

    Jake Tapper

    The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with the CNN anchor Jake Tapper about learning from mistakes in journalism, watching the media destroy someone you know, and what President Trump is getting right.

    Read the transcript.
  • Episode 1

    Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (featuring Ta-Nehisi Coates)

    In the inaugural episode of The Atlantic Interview, The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie about race, identity, and her reaction to a nervous interviewer calling her "Chimichanga." Atlantic correspondent Ta-Nehisi Coates makes a cameo.

    Read the transcript
  • Trailer

    A sneak peak at The Atlantic Interview - a new show featuring Jeffrey Goldberg in conversation with some of the most pivotal voices shaping politics, technology, art, media, business, and culture.