A Heatwave in Greenland

Recent unseasonably warm temperatures, brought to Greenland by a heat wave that smashed records across Europe a week before, have accelerated the melting of the ice sheet that covers 82 percent of the country, releasing water at record rates. On Thursday alone, an estimated 12.5 billion tons of meltwater flowed into the ocean, which would be the highest single-day total since 1950, according to Ted Scambos, a senior researcher at the National Snow and Ice Data Center, quoted in The Washington Post. Snow and ice melt every summer in Greenland, and this heat wave was an anomalous event, but climatologists warn that overall warming trends intensify such events, and make them more likely in years to come. The Associated Press cites a June 2019 study that concluded “melting ice in Greenland alone will add between 5 and 33 centimeters (2 to 13 inches) to rising global sea levels by the year 2100.”

Read more
Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.

Most Recent

  • Eduard Korniyenko / Reuters

    Photos of the Week: Ghost Ship, Greek Spring, Naked Festival

    Dog catchers in Cairo, luge championships in Russia, flooding in parts of England, a crash at the Daytona 500, demining in Colombia, Carnival in Venice, and much more

  • Art Media / Print Collector / Getty

    The Great Sphinx of Giza Through the Years

    Images of the Sphinx over the past 170 years, from Maxime du Camp’s 1849 travel photo to 21st-century light shows

  • Alexey Malgavko / Reuters

    Homeless in Siberia: Surviving the Winter

    Images from the photojournalist Alexey Malgavko of some of the homeless inhabitants of Omsk, Russia

  • Aly Song / Reuters

    Photos: Life in the Time of Coronavirus

    Images from Wuhan, Beijing, Shanghai, and other locations in China over the past two weeks, as residents continue to cope with COVID-19