From Cornerstone to Skyscraper: One World Trade Center

Shortly after the attacks of September 11, 2001, discussion began about what, if anything, to build in place of the fallen Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. After years of planning, negotiation, and false starts, a complex of towers, memorials, and a museum was settled on—its main building a super-tall structure called “Freedom Tower.” Construction of the tower began in 2006. In 2009, the skyscraper was officially renamed One World Trade Center. In 2012, it became the tallest building in New York City. In 2013, its spire was added, allowing One World Trade Center to reach its final height of 1,776 feet, and in 2014, the building opened for business. The final cost of the 104-story tower, which boasts 3 million square feet of rentable space, was more than $3.9 billion. Collected here, a look at the construction and development of the new One World Trade Center, and how it has changed the skyline of New York City.

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