On the Border With the Photographer John Moore

Getty Images photographer John Moore has won many photojournalism awards throughout his career, bringing a high level of skill, empathy, professionalism, perseverance, and an amazing eye for beauty and color to all of his work. Moore has spent years working along the U.S.-Mexico border, and regularly travels to Mexico and Central America, covering the many issues that surround the ongoing immigration crisis—its root causes in poverty, violence, and hopelessness; the dream of the United States as a better place for individuals and their children; the hazards of the immigrant’s journey; the pursuits and arrests at the border; the faces of those who choose to defend the border and of those who decide to risk everything to cross it. Gathered here, to give some visual context to Moore’s now-famous image of the young girl crying at the border, a collection of photographs taken by Moore over the past two years along the southern U.S. border, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and more. And, for more in-depth coverage from John Moore, be sure to check out his new book, Undocumented: Immigration and the Militarization of the United States-Mexico Border.

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